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Audi Q3

The independent definitive Audi Q3 video review
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    SMALL WONDER (some text hidden)

    By Jonathan Crouch

    SUVs don't need to be big to be desirable. Audi aims to prove the point with this MK2 model Q3. Jonathan Crouch reports.

    Ten Second Reviewword count: 72

    Audi continues to target the ever-growing market for premium-badged mid-sized five-seat SUVs with this second generation version of its stylish little Q3. This car's now cleverer, smarter and more efficient, all of these being attributes it'll need if it's to make headway in this increasingly crowded segment. When it comes to this kind of car, there are certainly cheaper options. The question though, is whether there are really any more desirable ones.

    Backgroundword count: 147

    Sales of five-seat Qashqai-class Crossovers have certainly taken off in recent years. Nor is it only the mainstream brands that are offering us cars of this kind - family hatches with raised ride heights and a dose of SUV-style attitude. The premium makers are at it too, with cars like this one, Audi's desirable second generation Q3. This model has been a useful seller for the Ingolstadt maker since the MK1 model's original launch in 2011, but these days, it's facing tougher competition. Its closest rival, BMW's X1, has upped its game, Mercedes also does well in this profitable market niche with its GLA model and the more recent Jaguar E-PACE and Volvo XC40 models have already found a ready band of buyers. For all these reasons, this Audi needed to evolve - as it has in the MK2 model guise we're going to look at here.

    Driving Experienceword count: 223

    To start with, there are four engine options - three petrol TFSI units and one TDI diesel - with power outputs ranging from 150PS to 230PS. All four engines are four-cylinder direct injection units with turbocharging. Things kick off with the '35 TFSI' front-driven derivative, which offers a 150PS 1.5-litre engine that uses the cylinder on demand efficiency system, which temporarily switches off two cylinders at low load. Buyers choose between a six-speed manual or a seven-speed S tronic automatic. Next up is the 2.0-litre TFSI petrol unit, offered with 190PS in the '40 TFSI' and with 230PS in the '45 TFSI'. Either way, you get S tronic auto transmission and quattro 4WD as standard. For folks still wanting a diesel, there's the '35 TDI', which gets you the usual 2.0-litre TDI powerplant with 150PS. Here, the choice is between a front-driven manual variant or a quattro auto. You can also talk to your Audi Centre about a 190PS version of this diesel engine. Adaptive damping is optional and you can adjust it via the settings of the standard Audi drive select dynamic handling system. Also standard is progressive steering, the ratio of which becomes gradually more direct as the steering angle increases. Hill descent control is also optional, to help you down slippery slopes, should you ever use your Q3 'off piste'.

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    Pictures (high res disabled)

    Statistics (subset of data only)

    Min

    Max

    0-62 mph (s):

    4.2

    9.3

    Combined mpg:

    32.8

    62.8

    Extra urban mpg:

    41.5

    68.9

    Height (mm):

    1580

    1608

    Length (mm):

    4388

    4411

    Max Speed (mph):

    126

    167

    ... and 6 other stats available

    Scoring (subset of scores)

    Category: Crossover or SUV 4x4s

    Performance
    70%
    Handling
    70%
    Comfort
    70%
    Space
    70%
    Styling, Build, Value, Equipment, Depreciation, Handling, Insurance and Total scores are available with our full data feed.

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