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Citroen C3

The independent definitive Citroen C3 video review
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    A QUESTION OF CHARACTER (some text hidden)

    By Jonathan Crouch

    The improved version of Citroen's third generation C3 supermini is a crucial car for the French brand. Can it deliver? Jonathan Crouch checks it out

    Ten Second Reviewword count: 54

    Citroen's third generation C3 supermini gets a wash 'n brush-up here, with a slightly smarter looks, comfier seats and extra personalisation options. It's still one of the most comfort-orientrated small cars you can buy too. Ultimately, there's nothing really revolutionary on offer here, but as a complete and highly personalisable package, it's desirably different.

    Backgroundword count: 170

    Today to survive, Citroen must offer more than just sensible efficiency: the PSA Group has its Peugeot brand to deliver that. And its DS nameplate to offer a fashion-conscious premium option for those prepared to pay a little more. Which leaves Citroen needing to go back to being the kind of manufacturer it once was, fun, innovative and different. Which, at first glance at least, appears to be what's served up here with this improved version of the third generation C3 supermini. Over 750,000 MK3 C3 models have been sold since the car was launched in 2016 but there's tougher competition now, not least in the form of this car's in-house PSA Group supermini cousins, the MK2 Peugeot 208 and the latest 'F'-series Vauxhall Corsa. Unlike this this C3, those two contenders ride on the group's more modern CMP modular platform. The C3 plods on with the older PF1 chassis. Still, who cares about the oily bits? This car's smarter, comfier and far more customisable now. What's not to like?

    Driving Experienceword count: 227

    Small French cars used to ride beautifully, grip tenaciously and flow from corner to corner with relaxed, unflustered motion. As, by and large, this one does. It may come as news to some motoring journalists but most supermini buyers don't routinely want to throw their cars about as if they were on stage from the RAC Rally. What most of them would prefer is a model that rolls the red carpet over the average appallingly surfaced British road. As, to a great extent, this one does. It's all down to the way that the fairly conventional suspension set-up has been tuned, though the downside of that is inevitably extra body roll through the bends. Stay with it though and you'll find that there's actually more grip and traction on offer than you might think. As for engines, well the PureTech three cylinder 1.2-litre unit is frugal and willing, while the 1.6-litre BlueHDi diesels are amongst the cleanest and most frugal engines of their kind in the industry. First up is the 1.2-litre petrol PureTech unit which offers either 83 or 110hp and delivers the same distinctive three cylinder thrum but accompanies it with pokier performance. The turbo 110hp variant gets a 6-speed manual gearbox and can be ordered with an optional EAT6 auto transmission. There's also a BlueHDi 100 diesel manual option with a 5-speed manual 'box.

    To see the full road test text contact us on 0330 0020 227

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    Category: Small Runabouts

    Performance
    60%
    Handling
    70%
    Comfort
    80%
    Space
    70%
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