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Mercedes-Benz C-Class Estate

C MORE (some text hidden)

By Jonathan Crouch

The improved Mercedes C-Class Estate smartens up its act. Jonathan Crouch reports.

Ten Second Reviewword count: 47

The improved fourth generation Mercedes-Benz C-Class Estate offers subtle exterior revisions and inside, the option of a fully-digital instrument cluster. Plus the driving experience has been enhanced with fresh engine-ware and the optional application of Mercedes' latest autonomous driving technology. As before, there's a practical 490-litre boot.

Backgroundword count: 78

At its original launch in 2014, the fourth generation C-Class Estate boasted that it offered the largest boot of any C-Class station wagon yet made. That wasn't saying too much, the 490-litre figure being only 5-litres bigger than the previous generation model and still well inferior to apparently smaller, humbler station wagons. Still, buyers in this segment don't usually come looking for ultimate capacity. They want sophistication and class - which this improved MK4 model provides in spades.

Driving Experienceword count: 299

As you'd expect, the handling of this estate variant is pretty much indistinguishable from the saloon model. The C-Class has for some time been, and will continue to be, a car with a clear focus on comfort and refinement - at least in its mainstream guises anyway. It was the first model in this class to offer the option of air suspension, though most buyers stick with the standard steel springs. As before, across the range there's a standard 'DYNAMIC SELECT' driving modes system - and you can add to that with optional 'DYNAMIC BODY CONTROL' adaptive damping. All models come as standard with 9G-Tronic automatic transmssion, which now features nine speeds and buyers certainly aren't short of engine options, with most still likely to want a diesel. There's a base 160hp 1.5-litre unit in the C200d. But most buyers opt for the 2.0-litre 194hp unit on offer in the C220d variant, which offers the option of 4MATIC 4WD. The entry-level petrol unit in the base C180 is a 1.6-litre 156hp powerplant, but ideally you'd stretch to the more modern, much perkier 184hp 1.5-litre engine installed in the C200 which features the brand's latest 'EQ Boost' technology using a 48volt on-board network with a belt-driven starter/alternator. When accelerating, 'EQ Boost' system can assist the engine with an additional 14hp, bridging the brief moment until the turbocharger has built up its full charge pressure. 4MATIC 4WD is optional. Mercedes has also developed a 2.0-litre 258hp version of this petrol engine for the C300 derivative. Beyond that lie only the Mercedes-AMG high performance derivatives. The first of these, the 3.0-litre V6 C43 4MATIC, now puts out 390hp, 23hp more than before. Beyond that lies only the V8 C63 AMG model, with a 4.0-litre V8 Biturbo engine offering either 476 or 510hp.

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Pictures (high res disabled)

Statistics (subset of data only)

Min

Max

0-62mph (secs):

4.1

8.7

[C63 Estate 4.0 AMG S Auto]

[C200d Estate 1.6 SE]

Braked Tow Weight (kg):

0

1800

[C63 Estate 4.0 AMG Auto]

[C200 Estate 2.0 SE Auto]

CO2 (g/km):

115

229

[C200d Estate 1.6 SE]

[C63 Estate 4.0 AMG S Auto]

Cylinders:

4

8

[C200 Estate 2.0 SE Auto]

[C63 Estate 4.0 AMG Auto]

Emissions:

6

Engine Power (bhp):

160

510

[C200d Estate 1.6 SE]

[C63 Estate 4.0 AMG S Auto]

... and 22 other stats available

Scoring (subset of scores)

Category: Luxury Saloons and Estates

Performance
80%
Handling
80%
Comfort
70%
Space
70%
Styling, Build, Value, Equipment, Depreciation, Handling, Insurance and Total scores are available with our full data feed.

This is an excerpt from our full review.
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