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Nissan Pixo (2009 - 2013)

PIX PERFECT? (some text hidden)

By Andy Enright

Introductionword count: 108

Nissan gets so much right in launching new cars that it can be excused the occasional swing and a miss. The Murano, the Cube and the car we look at here, the Pixo citycar, all failed to significantly excite the British public. As we've seen with many such models however, what can make an underwhelming new car can often make a good used buy. A lack of market recognition, oversupply of rival models or just buyers relying on outdated perceptions can mean that perfectly good cars can become forgotten about and therefore make excellent used bargains. Does the neglected Pixo fit that bill? Read on to find out.

Modelsword count: 9

5dr city car (1.0 petrol [Visia, Acenta, n-tec, Tekna])

Historyword count: 192

Nissan's introduction of the Pixo was a timely piece of opportunism, or so it seemed. The Government had announced draft plans for the Vehicle Scrappage Scheme in 2008 and Nissan realised that with no citycar contender to pitch in beneath the Micra and the Note, it might well lose out in the sudden bonanza of buyers with a few grand in their back pockets looking to score something cheap and new. The 'new' part of the Pixo was open to a bit of debate. The car had been on sale in other markets badged as the Suzuki Alto, and was built very inexpensively in the Maruti-Suzuki plant in India. A revised front grille, headlights and branding and Nissan had an instant citycar contender. The problem was, it was neither as good nor as affordable as the Kia Picanto or the Hyundai i10, the two cars that are regarded as the biggest beneficiaries of the Scrappage Scheme. The Pixo enjoyed a few revisions in summer 2012, with fresh exterior colours, an improved interior and, crucially for tax and toll savings, a drop in CO2 emissions to 99g/km, before being quietly deleted in 2013.

What You Getword count: 188

Despite its diminutive dimensions, the five-door Pixo strikes a decent balance between compact design and practicality. There's space inside for four adults and their luggage as long as they pack very light. With the rear seats in place, load space is 129-litres. When it was first introduced, three trim grades were offered - Visia, Acenta and Tekna. The Visia undercut its Suzuki Alto sister car with its £6,995 price tag but that was still £1,000 more than you could grab a Kia Picanto for. It came complete with ABS brakes with EBD and twin front airbags. Buyers also get power steering, CD player with MP3 playback, front cup holders and rear wash/wipe. Step up a grade and a modest £750 premium netted you the Acenta, which was the best seller. Also available with a four-speed automatic transmission, the Acenta's kit list included side airbags, remote central locking, electric front windows, front fog lamps, colour-coded mirrors, plus door handles and the convenience of a 50/50 split folding rear seat. Topping the trim choice trio was the Tekna. Here you got air conditioning with pollen filter, ESP and curtain airbags.

To see the full road test text contact us on 0330 0020 227

Pictures (high res disabled)

Scoring (subset of scores)

Category: Small Runabouts

Performance
70%
Handling
70%
Comfort
70%
Space
80%
Styling, Build, Value, Equipment, Depreciation, Handling, Insurance and Total scores are available with our full data feed.

This is an excerpt from our full review.
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