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Toyota Yaris

GENERATION Y (some text hidden)

By Jonathan Crouch

The Toyota Yaris gets more sophisticated in fourth generation form - and features a superior self-charging hybrid engine. Jonathan Crouch reports.

Ten Second Reviewword count: 42

In MK4 model form, the Toyota Yaris has been further Europeanised with sharper styling, a better quality interior, improved media connectivity and significant changes to its segment-leading hybrid engine. What was already a class act has just become genuinely hard to overlook.

Backgroundword count: 182

If you were asked to name the cars vying for the title of best supermini, it would be a reasonable wager that the Toyota Yaris wouldn't be amongst your top three. If, on the other hand, you had to name a small car that would be trouble-free, cheap to run and easy to use, it would be right up there. The thing is, those criteria are exactly what many supermini buyers are looking for. They don't care if the car can't take the Esses at Donington flat without lapsing into understeer. It's an irrelevance for most but car magazines still put a huge priority on handling and award their 'best of' titles predominantly on which cars are most fun to drive at the limit. The Yaris has always been a supermini that works well in the real world and this fourth generation car is no exception. It has long lacked a bit of flair though, and Toyota has belatedly realised this, endowing the latest model with a lot more styling input, as well as engineering improvements. It's now exclusively a self-charging hybrid.

Driving Experienceword count: 199

Here, Yaris buyers won't get the conventional 1.0-litre and 1.5-litre petrol engines offered with the car in other markets. That's because the brand thinks customers will want the self-charging hybrid version. This electrified variant features a new 1.5-litre petrol powertrain mated to a CVT auto transmission that's claimed to be more linear in response than the old Yaris Hybrid 'rubber band'-like set-up. The electrified petrol engine is 1490cc in size but has the same bore, stroke and piston size as the 2.0-litre hybrid unit that Toyota uses in the Corolla. Maximum engine power is 90hp, the combined system output is 114hp and there's 120Nm of torque. This car makes 62mph in 10.5s en route to 109mph. The brand reckons that the new lithium-ion battery will be able to drain and recharge more quickly than the previous unit, which means that it will be able to provide more of an electric surge through the 79hp electric motor. As a result, the company expects that over 80% of urban journeys in this car will be able to be completed under electric power alone. On all models, ride quality should be better thanks to suspension tweaks and a considerably more rigid body.

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Pictures (high res disabled)

Statistics (subset of data only)

Min

Max

0-62 mph (s):

10.5

Combined mpg:

76.3

CO2 (g/km):

86

Max Speed (mph):

109

Scoring (subset of scores)

Category: Hybrid, Plug-in, Electric & Hydrogen

Performance
60%
Handling
60%
Comfort
60%
Space
60%
Styling, Build, Value, Equipment, Depreciation, Handling, Insurance and Total scores are available with our full data feed.

This is an excerpt from our full review.
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