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Vauxhall Corsa

BUT OF CORSA (some text hidden)

By Jonathan Crouch

The Vauxhall Corsa's back to have another crack at the supermini market. Could this be the time it breaks the Fiesta's stranglehold? Jonathan Crouch weighs up its chances.

Ten Second Reviewword count: 57

The fourth-generation Vauxhall Corsa delivers similar dimensions to the old car - but that's as far as the similarities go. With a fresh chassis and suspension and a three-cylinder petrol engine that takes star billing, it also gets a classier interior. Keep your eye on this one. It could give the Ford Fiesta a real tough time.

Backgroundword count: 155

How we used to chuckle at the Vauxhall Corsa, the totem of the clueless supermini driver. That was until 2006 when the Corsa suddenly and unexpectedly became one of the best cars in its class. It drove well, it felt solid and it even looked pretty perky. The VXR models were complete hooligans and the diesel versions reliable and economical. Small wonder the Corsa became a fixture in the UK top ten best selling cars, albeit glancing up with barely-disguised envy at the massive-selling Ford Fiesta. Lasting right through to 2015 has been one marathon innings for Vauxhall's baby and in recent years, the Corsa has started to feel its age. Newer rivals like the Volkswagen Polo, the Renault Clio and the Peugeot 208 have all queued up to join the Fiesta in attempting to give the Vauxhall a good working over, so General Motors probably think it's payback time. Say hello to the response.

Driving Experienceword count: 259

The Corsa has always been a pretty entertaining steer and Vauxhall is looking to continue that trend. Underpinning this latest fourth-generation car is a completely redesigned chassis with precisely zero carry-over components from the last model. It sports a 5mm lower centre of gravity, a stiffer front sub-frame and a sharper suspension geometry. The electrically-assisted power steering gets a City mode for you to twirl around effortlessly when parking , but receives a UK-specific tune to cater for our roads. Internal friction has been minimised, as has understeer. Both Comfort and Sport suspension set ups have improved dampers that aid ride quality. The star of the Corsa's engine range is the 1.0-litre, 3-cylinder turbo petrol unit. Recognising that diesel engines don't always make the big sales numbers in the supermini sector, Vauxhall has instead devoted its attention to super-efficient petrol units. The 1.0-litre is the only production three-cylinder engine on the market with a balancer shaft, helping it combat noise, vibration and harshness. This Euro6-compliant engine is offered on either 90 or 115PS power outputs and both manage 170Nm of torque at just 1,800rpm. An improved version of Vauxhall's 1.4 turbo engine is also featured and there are two budget naturally-aspirated petrol engines - a 1.2 and a 1.4-litre. Big improvements to the 1.3 CDTi diesel have elevated it to Euro 6 emissions standards. At the top of the range, there's the 205PS 1.6-litre turbocharged VXR hot hatch variant. Transmissions? Vauxhall has announced two six-speed gearboxes, a manual and an automatic, delivering greater efficiency and a slicker shift action.

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Pictures (high res disabled)

Statistics (subset of data only)

Min

Max

0-60 mph (s):

6.5

14.8

Combined mpg:

37.7

88.3

Extra urban mpg:

45.6

94.2

Height (mm):

1440

1488

Length (mm):

3839

4021

Max Speed (mph):

102

130

... and 5 other stats available

Scoring (subset of scores)

Category: Small Runabouts

Performance
60%
Handling
70%
Comfort
70%
Space
60%
Styling, Build, Value, Equipment, Depreciation, Handling, Insurance and Total scores are available with our full data feed.

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