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Mercedes-Benz Citan

CITY SLICKERS (some text hidden)

By Jonathan Crouch

Is this the Mercedes of city vans? Jonathan Crouch takes a look at the Citan.

Ten Second Reviewword count: 47

The Citan is a well-engineered city van that comes in three different lengths with both petrol and diesel engines which offer great economy and emissions. Yes, it's effectively a badge-engineered Renault Kangoo and is made in the same plant, but it will appeal to a different customer.

Backgroundword count: 193

If there's one word that sums up the Mercedes-Benz approach to vehicle development, it's probably thoroughness. These are very considered vehicles, developed with a specific task and customer in mind and are finely honed to that end. You can probably think of endless examples of Mercedes passenger cars that fit that description but, if anything, the company's commercial vehicles are even more impressive. The reason? While many of the cars get an easier ride on the strength of badge equity, the vans and trucks often need to distinguish themselves on an absolutely objective basis. That's the measure of the task facing the Mercedes-Benz Citan city van. It's a hugely significant vehicle for Mercedes. Small vans make up 45 per cent of the European LCV market and without such a product in their range, the company's growth aspirations have always been capped. Many business want contracts with one manufacturer, and without a city van in the line up, they've gone looking elsewhere. That's not the case any more. But is the Citan all that it seems? Developed in conjunction with Renault, is it anything other than a badge-engineered Kangoo van? Let's take a look.

Driving Experienceword count: 220

The chassis on the Citan is based on a MacPherson strut front end with rubber mounts on the lower wishbones to ensure good driving characteristics and a high degree of comfort. The rear axle is a space-saving compound-link axle with trailing arms, coil springs and an internal stabiliser. Nothing too radical there; just a benchmark of the class best. The engineering team set out to achieve typical Mercedes driving characteristics through a combination of driving dynamics, safety and comfort. The electric power steering, with a steering column that is adjustable in height, combines both accuracy and efficiency, the power assistance dependent on driving speed. It ensures low effort when manoeuvring and a reassuring feel at higher speeds. The Citan is offered with a broad range of powerplants. Most customers will choose a version of the turbodiesel direct-injection Mercedes-Benz OM607 unit and there are three, which all share a displacement of 1.5-litres. First up is the Citan 108 CDI, with a 75PS power output and 180Nm of torque. Then there's the Citan 109 CDI (90PS and 200Nm) and then the punchy Citan 111 CDI (110PS, 240Nm). Also offered in most markets is the Citan 112, a turbocharged 1.2-litre petrol engine with a 114PS output and 190Nm of torque. Yes, that's right, a 1.2 petrol with more torque than a 1.5 diesel.

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Pictures (high res disabled)

Statistics (subset of data only)

Min

Max

Boot capacity min (litres):

4

CO2 (g/km):

112

144

Height (mm):

1255

Length (mm):

953

Power (PS):

75

113

Torque lb ft:

148

155

... and 3 other stats available

Scoring (subset of scores)

Category: Vans

Performance
60%
Handling
60%
Comfort
80%
Space
80%
Styling, Build, Value, Equipment, Depreciation, Handling, Insurance and Total scores are available with our full data feed.

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