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Vauxhall Grandland X

The independent definitive Vauxhall Grandland X video review
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    GRAND DESIGNS (some text hidden)

    By Jonathan Crouch

    Vauxhall finally has a credible contender in the mid-sized SUV class. But just how competitive can this Grandland X model be? Jonathan Crouch decides.

    Ten Second Reviewword count: 58

    The Grandland X is the third member of Vauxhall's 'X' SUV family, which also includes the Mokka X and the Crossland X. With a sporty design and off-road looks, the Grandland X has elevated seating for five people, generous luggage space, good all-round visibility and a raft of safety technologies. There's plug-in hybrid technology now on offer too.

    Backgroundword count: 155

    It's surprising how long it's taken Vauxhall to get itself proper representation in the mid-sized 'Qashqai-class' family SUV segment. Yes, there was the Korean-built Antara model that sold between 2007 and 2016, but that car was crude, expensive to run and not very well built. Buyers almost universally ignored it. Which was a problem for the Griffin brand, at a time when Nissan Qashqais and Peugeot 3008s were flying from the showrooms. What to do? Economics meant that some sort of platform-sharing deal for representation in this sector would be essential, so Vauxhall turned to Peugeot, with whom the brand was starting to consider a merger. Well before that happened, a deal was concluded to see the creation of a small SUV (the Vauxhall Crossland X) created from the underpinnings of a Peugeot 2008. And a mid-sized model (this Grandland X) to be built using the platform and engineering of a MK2 model Peugeot 3008.

    Driving Experienceword count: 256

    Engine-wise, mainstream Grandland X buyers are offered a PSA-sourced choice of units, either a three cylinder 130PS 1.2-litre petrol powerplant or a 130PS 1.5-litre CDTi diesel. There are manual and automatic transmission options in both cases. Near the top of the range, there's an auto-only 177PS 2.0-litre CDTi range-topping model. All the variants just mentioned are front-driven. If you can afford more, Vauxhall hopes you'll consider the top petrol/electric plug-in 'Hybrid4' variant, which uses a 1.6-litre direction turbo, offers 4WD and delivers a combined output of 300PS. Whatever your choice of engine, don't expect handling to be especially rewarding; if you want that, why on earth are you considering buying an SUV in the first place? Like most of its rivals, Vauxhall has focused instead on ride and refinement and you can expect high class standards to be matched in this regard. On the mainstream front-driven models, the brand offers an optional electronic Grip Control system that ensures traction in diverse driving situations. The driver has a choice of five driving modes: for each one the system adapts the torque distribution to the front wheels, allows wheel-spin if necessary, and, with the automatic transmission, adjusts shift points as well as throttle response. This ensures traction and stable handling regardless of the road surface. The brand continues to deliver on its commitment to lead in lighting technology, equipping the Grandland X with Adaptive Forward Lighting LED headlamps. With these, functions such as cornering light, high beam assist and auto levelling guarantee optimal illumination of the road ahead.

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    Category: Crossover or SUV 4x4s

    Performance
    70%
    Handling
    70%
    Comfort
    80%
    Space
    80%
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