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Nissan NV250

SOMETHING BORROWED SOMETHING NEW? (some text hidden)

By Jonathan Crouch

Nissan's NV250 compact van has a familiar feel but a class-leading warranty. Jonathan Crouch takes a look.

Ten Second Reviewword count: 46

Operators of small vans don't care about the provenance of the designs they're presented with: only whether they're competitively priced, practically-shaped, capable of carrying stout loads and come supported by a peace of mind warranty. Nissan's NV250 seems to tick quite a few of those boxes.

Backgroundword count: 174

Nissan shares its commercial vehicle designs with Renault - with one exception, the compact NV200 model, now available only in full-electric form. Until mid-2019, that LCV could be had with a diesel engine too but Nissan baulked at the cost of having to update this model's black pump-fuelled unit to the latest Euro6d-TEMP emission regulations and also needed a compact model that was available in a greater number of body styles and was more compatible for conversion. The solution was obvious; namely to do what Nissan does with its mid-sized and large vans and simply re-badge an existing Renault product, in this case the Kangoo. The current Renault Kangoo is a second generation design that's been on sale since way back in 2010 and the French brand has already revealed a concept design for its replacement. But Nissan decided it couldn't wait for that, so has pressed ahead with a light visual re-working of that Renault's front end and created this NV250 model to slot in as the starting point in its LCV range.

Driving Experienceword count: 225

The NV250 does of course share all its engines with its Renault Kangoo donor model. There are only engines: Nissan hasn't taken the Kangoo's full-electric Z.E. powertrain because it's continuing to sell the NV200 in full-electric form. So NV250 buyers must have diesel power, refined to the Euro6d-TEMP regulations that the old black pump-fuelled NV200 model couldn't meet. There are three 1.5-litre dCi options, with outputs of 80, 95 and 115hp: that's for the panel van. The Crew Van version drops the least powerful of these three units. The underpinnings here were originally derived from Renault's Scenic MPV and these origins can be felt out on the road. The ride is more compliant and forgiving over the worst surface imperfections than we've come to expect in a compact van but the flipside is that body-control can be slightly wayward if you should press into corners with undue vigour. The longer wheelbase of the L2 variant helps it provide a more composed ride and handling package than the shorter L1 option, which bounces around a little more. On the downside, the turning circle increases with the extra length but most drivers will hardly notice, the NV250 always feeling manoeuvrable for its size. All models have great forward visibility courtesy of the extensive windscreen and truncated bonnet, while the well-weighted steering and positive gear change also impress.

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Pictures (high res disabled)

Statistics (subset of data only)

Min

Max

Height (mm):

1805

Length (mm):

4213

Weight (kg):

1962

Width (mm):

1829

Payload Capacity (sq m):

650

800

Scoring (subset of scores)

Category: Vans

Performance
70%
Handling
60%
Comfort
80%
Space
80%
Styling, Build, Value, Equipment, Depreciation, Handling, Insurance and Total scores are available with our full data feed.

This is an excerpt from our full review.
To access the full content library please contact us on 0330 0020 227 or click here

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