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Hyundai Kona

KING KONE (some text hidden)

By Jonathan Crouch

Hyundai's Kona has set its sights on small supermini-based SUVs in the Juke and Captur segment and now offers enticing hybrid and all-electric options. Jonathan Crouch reports

Ten Second Reviewword count: 57

Hyundai fills a conspicuous gap in its model range with this Kona, a little SUV aimed at the many supermini-based models now populating the smaller part of the quickly-growing Crossover segment. It's more extrovertly styled than you might expect a Hyundai to be and ticks all the right boxes in terms of efficiency, safety and media connectivity.

Backgroundword count: 136

There are advantages to turning up late to any party. The 'event' in question in this case is the quickly growing market for small supermini-based SUVs, a segment that manufacturers like Nissan and Renault have been enjoying vast sales in for most of the last decade. Other volume brands were left on the back foot and it's taken them some time to catch up. That's changing now and the model we're going to look at here, Hyundai's Kona, is just one of a whole series of models seeking to make inroads in this potentially profitable segment. This contender was originally launched in the Autumn of 2017 in petrol form but more recently, hybrid variants and an all-electric version have been added to the range. It all creates a pretty complete small SUV. Let's find out why.

Driving Experienceword count: 230

Kona buyers get a choice between two petrol engines. The entry-level 1.0-litre T-GDI three-cylinder turbo is borrowed from the i30 and puts out 120PS and 175Nm of torque. It's manual only, using a six-speed box, and drives through its front wheels only. The other unit on offer is a 1.6-litre four-cylinder variant with 175PS, available only with a seven-speed dual-clutch auto box and the only derivative in the Kona line-up offered with 4WD. This top petrol model can make 62mph from rest in just 7.9 seconds on the way to 127mph flat out. For the 1.0 T-GDI, the figures are 12.0s and 112mph. There are 2WD-only petrol hybrid alternatives too, using a 1.6-litre petrol unit with a 105PS power output, electrified assistance and a 7-speed dual clutch auto transmission. There's also an all-electric version, available in either a base 39kWh/135PS form or an uprated 64kWh/204PS guise. Hyundai claims a driving range of up to 300 miles. Small Crossovers in this class need to be able to offer fun, agile handling, something Hyundai says is delivered in the Kona thanks in large part to an advanced multilink rear suspension system - though this is only fitted to higher-output models. Lesser-powered versions get the kind of cheaper torsion beam rear set-up that features on less advanced rivals. There's also an 'Advanced Traction Cornering Control' package to improve traction and damping in bends.

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Pictures (high res disabled)

Statistics (subset of data only)

Min

Max

0-62 mph (s):

7.9

Combined mpg:

53.3

CO2 (g/km):

119

Height (mm):

1550

Length (mm):

4165

Price:

15000

23000

Width (mm):

1800

Scoring (subset of scores)

Category: Crossover or SUV 4x4s

Performance
70%
Handling
70%
Comfort
70%
Space
80%
Styling, Build, Value, Equipment, Depreciation, Handling, Insurance and Total scores are available with our full data feed.

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