The below editorial is an excerpt from our full review.
To access the full content library please contact us on 0330 0020 227 or click here

Vauxhall Astra

ASTRA-NOMICAL? (some text hidden)

By Jonathan Crouch

Vauxhall has rejuvenated its MK7 model Astra family hatch. Jonathan Crouch takes a look.

Ten Second Reviewword count: 72

Vauxhall has delivered us a smarter, cleverer and more efficient version of its British-built seventh generation Astra. A fresh range of three cylinder petrol and diesel engines bring the oily bits up to date and make a big difference to running costs. Plus safety now meets today's higher class standards and you can specify extra high-end luxury features you couldn't have had before. In short, this Astra's now worth a second look.

Backgroundword count: 151

Despite Vauxhall's best efforts over more than three decades and six different generations, their Astra has rarely been the family hatchback its drivers would ideally have chosen to own. Not because it's ever been a bad car: just never a class-leading one. The kind of model you bought because it was good value. Or more likely, because you were given the keys by your company Fleet Manager. This seventh generation version was tasked to do better - and the signs are that in this facelifted guise, it just might. As you may expect, it's smarter-looking, but more importantly, it's significantly more efficient than before thanks to a range of fresh 3 cylinder petrol and diesel engines; the most frugal diesel can eke nearly 65 miles out of a gallon of DERV on the now much-stricter WLTP official test. And even the petrols can get around 50mpg. It still drives well too.

Driving Experienceword count: 214

The key changes here lie beneath the bonnet. Previously, there was just a single 3 cylinder engine in the range. Now the old units have gone and the line-up is built around this format. There are two fresh petrol units, a 1.2 developing either 110, 130 or 145PS and mated to 6-speed manual transmission. And a 1.4 putting out 145PS which has to be had with a new 7-speed CVT auto 'box. All the engines develop reasonable pulling power, with outputs ranging between 195 and 236Nm. Vauxhall's particularly pleased with throttle response with these engines, claiming that 90% of their pulling power is available within 1.5 seconds of pressing the accelerator. The diesel engine is new too, a 1.5-litre three cylinder powerplant offered in two states of tune, 105PS and 122PS. The more potent unit gets the option of a new 9-speed auto gearbox. These engines feature an electrically-activated turbocharger with variable geometry turbine vanes and, similar to their petrol counterparts, a balance shaft in the block for additional refinement. Torque output figures vary between 260 to 300Nm. There are no suspension or handling changes, which means that this MK7 model continues with a relatively simple torsion beam rear suspension system, a set-up enhanced with a so-called 'Watts linkage' feature to improve cornering stability.

To see the full road test text contact us on 0330 0020 227

Pictures (high res disabled)

Statistics (subset of data only)

Min

Max

0-62 mph (s):

7.8

13.8

Combined mpg:

38.7

76.3

CO2 (g/km):

97

172

Extra urban mpg:

48.7

80.7

Height (mm):

1510

Insurance group:

9

26

... and 6 other stats available

Scoring (subset of scores)

Category: Compact Family Cars

Performance
70%
Handling
80%
Comfort
70%
Space
70%
Styling, Build, Value, Equipment, Depreciation, Handling, Insurance and Total scores are available with our full data feed.

This is an excerpt from our full review.
To access the full content library please contact us on 0330 0020 227 or click here

Subscriber? Login here

Mobile
Narrow
Narrower
Normal
Wide