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Ford Galaxy

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY (some text hidden)

By Jonathan Crouch

Ford has decided that the latest version of the Galaxy needs a bit more than mere practicality. Jonathan Crouch reports

Ten Second Reviewword count: 66

Ford brings us an improved version of its fourth-generation Galaxy seven-seater, a model that's more efficient thanks to a hi-tech pair of EcoBlue diesel engines. Plus it's better connected and continues with practical virtues that include an innovative third seat folding system. With a wide range of options and pleasing interior quality, this one's going to be at the top of quite a few family shortlists.

Backgroundword count: 218

On the face of it, building a large MPV ought to be easy. After all, isn't something like this just a big box on wheels? It always used to be. Not so long ago, all you really needed with a car like this was a set of fancy flippy-folding seats and a few clever interior storage solutions. That and the ability for the model in question not to fall over when presented with a corner. These days, things are a lot tougher for those brands looking to create a design of this kind. Buyers are more demanding. They want the interior build quality of a luxury saloon. They want exciting styling. And the last thing they're looking for is the kind of handling you'd expect from a big box on wheels. The game has changed. These objectives are inevitably difficult to achieve. It's hard to give an MPV sharp handling and even more difficult to make such a car grab your attention from a visual perspective. Still, Ford managed to do both of these things with the first generation version of their sporty S-MAX People Carrier. Buoyed by the success of that vehicle, the Blue Oval brand carried forward what it learnt from that project into the S-MAX's squarer showroom stablemate, this fourth generation Galaxy, here usefully improved.

Driving Experienceword count: 203

Ford is offering this car with its latest 2.0-litre EcoBlue diesel engine in two forms. At the top of the range, there's a 190PS version of this unit mated to 8-speed auto transmission and putting out a lusty 400Nm of torque, but most versions of this car will be sold in 150PS form where there's a choice of manual or auto transmission. With the 190PS variant, there's also the option of the brand's 'Intelligent All-Wheel Drive' system - which will be a welcome boon for towers who in this form can pull up to 2,000kgs. The AWD system continually measures how the car's wheels are gripping the road surface every 16 milliseconds; can adjust power delivery to individual wheels in 100 milliseconds; and can send 100 per cent of available engine torque to the rear wheels. Copious use of sound-deadening materials and thick door seals contribute to a particularly quiet cabin. Self-levelling rear suspension is also available. Adaptive electronic steering is a standard fitment and includes the intriguingly-named 'Active Nibble Compensation' system that cancels out unwanted feedback, forces and vibration at the helm. The rear suspension is the same integral link set-up as seen on the current Mondeo. It's good, in other words.

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Pictures (high res disabled)

Statistics (subset of data only)

Min

Max

0-62 mph (s):

8.8

13.4

Combined mpg:

34.9

54.3

CO2 (g/km):

139

189

Extra urban mpg:

44.1

60.1

Height (mm):

1764

Insurance group:

16

27

... and 6 other stats available

Scoring (subset of scores)

Category: MPV People Carriers

Performance
70%
Handling
80%
Comfort
80%
Space
100%
Styling, Build, Value, Equipment, Depreciation, Handling, Insurance and Total scores are available with our full data feed.

This is an excerpt from our full review.
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