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Fiat 500X

X HITS THE SPOT (some text hidden)

By Jonathan Crouch

These days, every mainstream brand needs a small, trendy Crossover. Here's Fiat's take on the Juke-genre, the fashionable 500X. Jonathan Crouch reports on the revised model.

Ten Second Reviewword count: 62

Fiat offers buyers in the small SUV segment an improved version of its characterful 500X Crossover model. It's bigger than it looks and there's a new range of more efficient three and four cylinder petrol engines on offer, plus improved connectivity and a whole stack of personalisation options. If you're looking for a surefire conversation starter, you can't do a lot better.

Backgroundword count: 99

It's easy to forget that Fiat actually has a history of small 4x4 cars. The Panda 4x4 first appeared over thirty years ago and has spawned many imitators. A few years ago, Fiat also fleshed their all-wheel drive selection out with the Sedici, essentially a rebodied Suzuki SX4, that made modest but useful sales. In 2015 though, the company decided to get really serious about the SUV 'B'-segment and launch this 500X, here usefully improved. It's based on the same running gear as Jeep's cute but capable Renegade and is available in both front-wheel drive and four-wheel drive guises.

Driving Experienceword count: 193

Though the 500X continues to be based around Jeep Renegade underpinnings, quite a lot has changed with this car from an engineering perspective. Diesel engines are no more and you can't now get 4WD either. Instead, the range is primarily based around a latest-generation family of petrol engines - a three cylinder 1.0-litre unit and a four cylinder 1.3. Unfortunately though, the least expensive 'Urban' variant continues with the old-tech four cylinder 110hp 1.6-litre petrol unit from the original 500X model line-up. The 1.0-litre models will probably suit most customers best, this 120hp powerplant developing a more than sufficient 190Nm of pulling power and being paired with a 6-speed manual gearbox. In this form, this car is impressively refined at motorway speeds. Rest to 62mph in the 1.0-litre models takes 10.9s en route to 117mph. If you go for the four cylinder 1.3-litre unit (which has 270Nm of torque), your car will feature Fiat's 6-speed dual clutch DCT automatic transmission. As before, the ride on the move remains a touch on the firm side, but this does help to restrict body movement through the corners. Steering feel is well-weighted but not especially communicative.

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Pictures (high res disabled)

Statistics (subset of data only)

Min

Max

0-62 mph (s):

9.8

10.5

Combined mpg:

47.1

68.9

CO2 (g/km):

109

144

Extra urban mpg:

56.5

74.3

Max Speed (mph):

116

118

Power (PS):

120

140

... and 2 other stats available

Scoring (subset of scores)

Category: Crossover or SUV 4x4s

Performance
50%
Handling
50%
Comfort
50%
Space
80%
Styling, Build, Value, Equipment, Depreciation, Handling, Insurance and Total scores are available with our full data feed.

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