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BMW 4 Series Gran Coupe

GRAN DEFT AUTO (some text hidden)

By Jonathan Crouch

So the coupe version of the BMW 3 Series is the 4 Series, right? Not if you add two more doors and call it a 4 Series Gran Coupe. Jonathan Crouch reports on the revised range.

Ten Second Reviewword count: 58

If you like the look of a BMW 4 Series Coupe but family duties look like forcing you into something a bit frumpier, help is at hand. The 4 Series Gran Coupe retains a sleek shape but adds a couple of rear doors. We think it's a much better bet than the frumpier 3 Series Gran Turismo model.

Backgroundword count: 155

Stick with us here. This one takes a bit of working out. BMW will sell you a four-door 3 Series but gives the two-door Coupe and Convertible versions a '4 Series' badge. So far, so good. If you want five doors in a compact executive model of this type from BMW, it's a little more complicated. There is a five-door 3 Series - the 'Gran Turismo' model - but very few people buy it. One of the reasons why is the existence of this car, the 4 Series Gran Coupe. Here, you get much more stylish five-door practicality, with all the usual 3 Series good bits underneath. These days, those good bits also include a rejuvenated range of petrol engines, plus the option of xDrive all-wheel drive and, with this recently revised model, smarter styling too. In short, it looks like there's most of what you're going to need here. Let's check this car out.

Driving Experienceword count: 262

Given that the 4 Series Gran Coupe runs on the same running gear as the 4 Series Coupe, it's reasonable to expect similar driving dynamics. The wheelbase, length, track and width of the Gran Coupe are exactly the same as its two-door sibling, so it clues you into what you're going to get. This 4 sits a bit closer to the road than a 3 Series and also gets the coupe's extra bracing between the front subframe and the body, beefing up steering response. On to engines. Diesel-wise, there's a choice of three units, starting with the 190bhp powerplant found in the 420d - the biggest seller and a variant available with either two or four wheel drive. Above that come the six cylinder diesel models. There are rear wheel drive and xDrive 4WD versions of the 258bhp 430d, before you get to the 435d xDrive diesel range-topper with a hefty 313bhp at its disposal. The more recent engineering changes with this car though, centre on the petrol units in the line-up. Not much is different with the base four cylinder 184bhp 2.0-litre unit found in the 420i, though it is slightly more efficient than it used to be and, as before, comes in rear wheel drive and xDrive 4WD guises. The pokier version of this powerplant carries a '430i' badge and has 252bhp, with 350Nm of torque, making possible a rest to 62mph time of just 5.9s. That makes it difficult to imagine why you'd want a six cylinder petrol model, but if you still do, there's a 326bhp '440i' variant.

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Pictures (high res disabled)

Statistics (subset of data only)

Min

Max

0-62 mph (s):

4.8

7.9

Combined mpg:

40.9

70.6

Extra urban mpg:

49.6

78.5

Height (mm):

1389

1404

Length (mm):

4638

Max Speed (mph):

132

155

... and 6 other stats available

Scoring (subset of scores)

Category: Luxury Saloons and Estates

Performance
80%
Handling
80%
Comfort
80%
Space
80%
Styling, Build, Value, Equipment, Depreciation, Handling, Insurance and Total scores are available with our full data feed.

This is an excerpt from our full review.
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