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Nissan Qashqai

QASH RICH (some text hidden)

By Jonathan Crouch

Improvements to Nissan's second generation Qashqai Crossover make it even more difficult for this mid-sized SUV model's host of imitators. Jonathan Crouch takes a look

Ten Second Reviewword count: 79

These days, the Nissan Qashqai is sleeker, feels more expensive inside and offers some of the most sophisticated electronic safety technology in the mid-sized SUV Crossover sector. Improvements to the 1.5-litre dCi diesel that most customers choose have enhanced its appeal. Plus there's a revised, more powerful 1.3-litre DIG-T petrol engine and the option of DCT automatic transmission in the front-driven-only range. There's a reason why this Nissan is such a hugely popular contender in the mid-sized SUV segment.

Backgroundword count: 171

Some automotive success stories are easy to predict. We all knew that the Audi R8 was a winner as soon as we drove it. Likewise, the Fiat 500 couldn't possibly fail once it made it to the showrooms virtually unchanged from the fantastic Trepiuno show car. But the Nissan Qashqai? That this unprepossessing vehicle should rack up some huge sales came right out of left field. Its predecessor, the Almera, could have been a synonym for mediocrity. Nissan played a really smart move though. They tore up the established supermini/family hatch/family saloon rulebook and started flooding the market with crossovers and SUVs. Some, like the Murano and the Pathfinder, never gelled with the public. Others, such as the X-Trail and the Juke, hit the targets. Then there was the Qashqai, which in 2007 found itself challenging the biggest-selling hatchbacks in the sales charts. A second generation version was launched in 2013 and this car has since been tweaked and upgraded to keep it competitive against an army of mid-sized Crossover rivals.

Driving Experienceword count: 208

On the face of things, not much has changed on this Qashqai in recent years in terms of its drive dynamics, though Nissan insists that under the skin, modifications to the suspension, damping and steering systems have resulted in a more refined on-the-road experience, plus refinement's better too. The range is now focused on front wheel drive, with suspension calibration performed in Europe to suit European tastes. Across the range, there's Active Trace Control which monitors the behaviour and trajectory of the car, and applies subtle braking to deliver a function similar to a Limited Slip Differential, providing the best traction and the least understeer. There's also a dual mode steering system which changes the weighting of the electrically-assisted rack when you select the Sport setting. Engine-wise, buyers get the choice of two downsized petrol units and two turbodiesels. The petrol powerplants comprise an 1.3-litre DIG-T offering that drives through a six-speed manual box with 140hp - or is offered with manual transmission or a DCT automatic when it has 160hp. Most customers will doubtless be drawn to the 115hp 1.5-litre dCi diesel; there's also a 1.7-litre dCi unit with 150hp. Both diesels come with manual or auto transmission and the 1.7-litre powerplant can be ordered with 4WD.

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Pictures (high res disabled)

Statistics (subset of data only)

Min

Max

0-62 mph (s):

9.1

12.9

Combined mpg:

47.1

74.3

CO2 (g/km):

99

138

Extra urban mpg:

55.4

78.5

Height (mm):

1590

1605

Length (mm):

4377

... and 5 other stats available

Scoring (subset of scores)

Category: Crossover or SUV 4x4s

Performance
80%
Handling
80%
Comfort
80%
Space
70%
Styling, Build, Value, Equipment, Depreciation, Handling, Insurance and Total scores are available with our full data feed.

This is an excerpt from our full review.
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