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Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI 150

A CAR FOR THE PEOPLE (some text hidden)

By Jonathan Crouch

The latest Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI is about as good as family hatches get. Jonathan Crouch explains why.

Ten Second Reviewword count: 58

If you're looking for an economical family hatch and you've a reasonably-sized budget to work with, start with the improved Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI and then consider other options. Chances are you'll come back to this model. With 150PS of grunt, 67.3mpg fuel economy and a chassis that delivers real fun, it's about as good as hatchbacks get.

Backgroundword count: 135

"Just buy a Golf." It's a bit of advice usually doled out by motoring journalists who don't want to listen to another protracted 'What car should I buy?' diatribe over dinner. Yet there's a reason for it. Volkswagen Golfs have tended to be so reliably excellent that it's hard to go wrong following this line of reasoning. Yes, some have been a little dull, but in choosing Volkswagen's hardy perennial, you always knew you weren't going to be saddled with a lemon. Still, times change and in order to make sure that I was still doing a sterling service for dinner party guests before ushering them onto more stimulating topics of conversation, I decided to get behind the wheel of what might be the pick of the recently improved Golf range, the 2.0-litre TDI 150.

Driving Experienceword count: 253

The TDI diesel badge that adorns this car's sharply chamfered rump might lull you into thinking you're in for a soporific spell behind the wheel. That's far from the case. The common rail diesel sparks up with a bit of a chunter but settles down into a modest idle. It's not so smooth that you're going to forget which pump to pull up at but it's far better than the agricultural old VW Pump-Duse diesel engines. It's more flexible too, this latest 150PS unit offering its peak torque of 320Nm between 1750 and 3000rpm. It feels seriously muscular and it works really well with the DSG twin-clutch gearbox. Sport mode will plug you straight into the meat of the torque and will hold gears a little longer if you're coming into a corner. This improved Golf Mk 7 does corners really rather well. There's just enough movement in the body to signal clearly where the limits of grip are, but punt the car into a well-sighted bend and it feels like a decent hot hatch in its grip, steering response and body control. Its performance in a straight line is more warm than hot, making 62mph in 8.6 seconds on the way to a top speed of 134mph, but it's a car that's easy to flow along a decent road with. You rarely feel the weight of the diesel engine in the nose and the expensive multi-link rear suspension means that there's little bump and thump entering the cabin even on poorly-surfaced roads.

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Pictures (high res disabled)

Statistics (subset of data only)

Min

Max

0-60 mph (s):

8.6

8.9

Boot capacity min (litres):

605

Boot capacity max (litres):

1620

Combined mpg:

62.8

67.3

CO2 (g/km):

108

Extra urban mpg:

68.9

76.3

... and 9 other stats available

Scoring (subset of scores)

Category: Family Cars

Performance
90%
Handling
80%
Comfort
70%
Space
80%
Styling, Build, Value, Equipment, Depreciation, Handling, Insurance and Total scores are available with our full data feed.

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