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Renault Kadjar (2015 - 2018)

The independent definitive Renault Kadjar (2015-2018) video review
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    KADJAR A LIFT (some text hidden)

    By Jonathan Crouch

    Introductionword count: 71

    Renault's Kadjar is a mid-sized SUV that's smart, sensible and, in its way, quite aspirational. Developed from much of the same technology that brought us the segment-leading Nissan Qashqai, it's certainly a more interesting family choice than that used Focus-class hatch you might have been considering and there's the option of 4WD if you want some substance to go with the style. Let's check out the 2015-2018 version as secondhand buy.

    Modelsword count: 16

    5dr SUV (1.2 TCe petrol / 1.5 dCi / 1.6 dCi diesel) [Expression+, Dynamique Nav, Signature])

    Historyword count: 157

    For a long time, Renault was never able to offer us a class-competitive family-sized SUV model but in 2015 the brand put that right with this car, the Kadjar. It's the family hatch-based big brother to the French maker's very successful supermini-based Captur model. It's based on Nissan Qashqai engineering and at first glance, many dismissed this car merely as Qashqai with a Renault re-style but there's much more to this SUV than that. Though the two vehicles do share 60% of their parts, Renault claims that 95% of what you see and feel in a Kadjar is completely new. It's certainly sharply styled and is able to offer a bigger boot than its Nissan counterpart. There's more affordable pricing too, especially when it comes to more powerful engines and the option of four wheel drive. The Kadjar was significantly facelifted at the end of 2018 but it's the earlier 2015-2018 era models we look at here.

    What You Getword count: 273

    So. What do we have here? A Nissan Qashqai with a Renault re-style? Or something more? The Kadjar certainly shares much with its Japanese design stablemate, primarily its 'CMF' 'Common Module Family' platform and most of its engine technology. Many though, will think this to be a more sleekly-styled car and it's certainly a more practical one, with a rear overhang lengthened to deal with the Qashqai's biggest problem, a lack of bootspace. The result is an appealing package that at first glance, seems to deliver everything that a modern Crossover of this kind should offer. And behind the wheel? Well not all Crossovers fully emphasise the slightly higher seating position that's supposed to help define his class of car but this one does, positioning you quite commandingly in front of a smartly-bespoke soft-touch dashboard. And in the rear? Well as usual in a car of this kind, it's comfortable for two adults but a little bit of a squash for three. Headroom though, is fine, unless you've a top model fitted with a panoramic roof, in which case really tall folk might be a touch restricted. The vast glass panel gives the cabin a lovely airy feel though. Where this car's extra body length does pay dividends is out back. Instead of the slightly restricted 430-litre boot you get in that Nissan model, there's a 472-litre trunk on offer in a Kadjar - once you get your stuff over the rather high boot lip. And you can make the most of it if you go for a car fitted with the adjustable-height boot floor and the neat 'One-Touch easy-folding' rear seat system.

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    Category: Crossover or SUV 4x4s

    Performance
    50%
    Handling
    70%
    Comfort
    70%
    Space
    80%
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